Powershell

Powershell and WMI.  A perfect marriage (except for that little affair with vbScript but we’re going to steer CLEAR of THAT whole thing)

I was wondering just how fast my computer was.  If there was anyway to see how fast my machine based upon the new WINSAT scores.

What do you suppose is the possibility there is way to tell that?  EASILY?

With Powershell and WMI teamed together it’s too easy.

GET-WMIOBJECT WIN32_WINSAT

Now of course it’s going to try and give us a bit too much information.  Here’s the ones we’re really interested in.  But really we just want the IMPORTANT stuff.  A quick SELECT-OBJECT or proper FORMAT-TABLE will show you what you want.

GET-WMIOBJECT WIN32_WINSAT | SELECT-OBJECT CPUSCORE,D3DSCORE,DISKSCORE,GRAPHICSSCORE,MEMORYSCORE

or

GET-WMIOBJECT WIN32_WINSAT | FORMAT-TABLE CPUSCORE,D3DSCORE,DISKSCORE,GRAPHICSSCORE,MEMORYSCORE –autosize

So why is this useful?  The ability to read the WINSAT score can tell you if a system is running as optimally as it can or more importantly if it’s up to the task of the Aero Desktop. 

Yes.  You can tell this remotely without logging in and spending hours on Inventory.  Running this command

GET-WMIOBJECT WIN32_WINSAT –computername SOMECOMPUTER | SELECT-OBJECT WINSATASSESSMENTSTATE, WINSPRLEVEL

Will allow you to tell whether an assessment has been run (WINASSESSMENTSTATE will yield a ‘1’ if it has) or the WINSPRLEVEL (Your overall WINSAT score)

Hint:  If you see a WINASSESSMENTSTATE that isn’t ‘1’ with a WINSPRLEVEL of 1.0; good chance the Assessment has never been run and THAT is the reason your user can’t use the cool new features in Vista or Windows 7.

Now you can sit back and remotely check out your systems abilities and capabilities all thanks to Powershell and WMI.  The world’s more INEXPENSIVE hardware inventory!

The Power of Shell is in YOU!

Sean
The Energized Tech

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